As a Prelude to NaNoWriMo

in which I revisit my Space Opera from 2 years ago, here’s the prologue from the 1st installment, titled The Mimic’s Mirror. It begins with…quite literally…An Earth Shattering Kaboom!
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Prologue: Set

AHD Technologies Unlimited Headquarters
Raleigh, North Carolina
United States of America
24 February, 2141

“I spend a lifetime building an empire, and now you’re telling me it’s going to burn, and there’s not a god-damned thing I can do about it?” The short man with the out-of-fashion goatee and a Gallic nose snarled. “Worse! Hell if I’m not a selfish bastard bitching about my business when the whole damned planet is about to go up in flames.”

“It’s only natural, Chairman Rocheforte,” the tall man fidgeted with his glasses as he continued.

“Stop trying to cheer me up, Kettel,” he growled.

The researcher gulped as he offered a tepid grin and continued, “The numbers are right. Government models have assumed a significant gravitational influence from Mars. That’s not going to happen.”

Jonathan Rocheforte, President and Chief Executive Officer of AHD Technologies Unlimited, nodded grimly. “Alright Doctor Kettel, thank you for this information. I’ll be calling on you again shortly.”

He sat back in his chair and watched his Chief of Research depart his office. Then he turned and looked south from their tower in the heart of the city’s skyline toward the old Freeway. We always think there’s more time. One day we find out we’re wrong.

He hit a button on his desk, and waited for the call to ring through. When it did, a perky, if older, voice with a soft southern accent responded, “Hello Jon. How are you today?”

“Outstanding. Until ten minutes ago, Sue,” Rocheforte admitted. “I’m about to make a serious change in my investment portfolio.”

“Oh?” Sue’s grimace came through the line. “Have we failed to meet your expectations?”

Rocheforte chuckled softly. “No dear. There’s nothing you can help. You’ll understand soon enough.” He paused to wonder if what he was about to do constituted Insider Trading. Hell with it! The SEC won’t have the time to prosecute me anyway. “I want you to liquidate all my planet-side investments, and then dump all AHD holdings not tied to space exploration.”

The pause that followed lengthened until it compelled the Chairman to check that the phone hadn’t dropped his call. When Sue spoke again, her normal sweet Southern drawl cracked like an egg on the rim of a frying pan. “Sir, I apologize. A transaction that large will have to be cleared through our managers.”

“Of course. Call me back when you receive it.” Rocheforte punched the button and picked up his VR headset. Slipping it on, he created a new message designated, ‘Emergency Closures.’ Then he flicked a button in the air corresponding to ‘all’, and then sent it to every Earth-bound facility in the globe. A confirmation with his password, and ninety percent of the empire he had spent a lifetime building would be closed within the month. Not quite as quickly as his world had been turned upside-down, but near enough.

Jonathan Rocheforte had not gained his financial throne by ignoring bedrock realities. Tonight he would burn his empire. Tomorrow he would begin to build a new one.
* * *

The White House
Washington D.C., USA
10 June, 2141

I sell my soul to become the most powerful man in the world, only to discover that in the most important event in its entire damned history, I’m a kibitzer. President Artemis Jenkins heard a knock on the door as he scrawled a note. Damned Service Officers. Can’t I even go to the John in peace?

He reached into his jacket and palmed a small, silver box with a looped handle beneath. Turning it over in his hand led him to revisit the earlier audience with his Chief of Staff. One his Vice President, a walking liability if there ever was one, was supposed to have attended. Scheffer, the man would be late to his own funeral.

“Do you want me to call the Vice President again?” his Chief of Staff, Maddix Kendell asked.

“Why?” the President answered. “I’m sure if we were going to ask Scheffer about the best crawfish place in New Orleans, he’d have a useful opinion. Until then, let him stay wherever he is.”

He glanced at the Resolute Desk to find a folder on his in-table monitor open, marked, ‘Set: Top Secret.’ Staring down at it, Jenkins frowned. “Why is our first order of business an astronomer’s curiosity?”

“Mister President,” the Chief of Staff’s voice trembled. “There’s been a…change to the projections. This report is from two of NASA’s best astrophysicists.

His frown deepened. Maddix was an old-school operator. It was his job to rattle cages, and he was damned good at it. If something had got to him, it was not good news.

The President lowered himself into his high-backed black leather chair. The former Junior Senator from Washington tapped a finger to open the folder and scanned through it to the ‘Findings’ section. He had learned in his days as a staffer to not waste his time with the egghead research. Just find the practical material in the back.

“Water,” he breathed while reading it. “Damn it Maddix! You’re sure about this? When I was campaigning, they said Set would barely come close enough to be seen without binoculars? Now you’re telling me this?”

“I’m afraid they’re convinced this is an extinction-level event, Mister President,”

The President muttered a curse. “What are we supposed to do? Confiscate every telescope in the world?” His stomach turned in knots as he took the offered glass. “Why don’t we simply blow the asteroid to Hell? We’ve no shortage of nuclear missiles to shoot at it.”

“I asked them the same question,” Maddix replied. “They looked at me like I was an idiot. At this range, they claim our weapons aren’t accurate enough, Mister President. The best we could hope is to divert the meteor enough to prevent impact. But even then, the bullet-burn would result in tidal waves and geological upheaval.”

“Stop me if I’m wrong,” President Jenkins answered sharply. “But that seems preferable to extinction.” He wanted to drum his fingers on the table, but that would appear undignified, and decorum was crucial to his role.

“Art,” Maddix held up a hand. “I’m just the messenger. They say there’s next to no chance of that working. Also, General Torray is waiting outside. He’s seen this, and has another set of concerns.”

“Oh why not?” he groaned. “Send him in.”

General Torray, Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff, marched in like a private on the boot camp grounds. But he spoke in the educated drone of a university professor. “Mister President, we also should consider the possibility that the Caliphate or China will take advantage of the chaos when this becomes general knowledge. If they discover we’ve shot our entire nuclear deterrent into space, they might attack with weapons of mass destruction.”

“You don’t believe they might actually care about the fate of the world?” the President replied.

With a snort, the General deadpanned, “More likely the Caliphate would take it as a sign to kill some Westerners on their way to Paradise.”

The thought of a year-long Jihad, or a war of retribution by China, followed by a meteor striking earth was only rendered slightly more palatable by the fact the projected impact zone was between Cairo and Tehran. Unfortunately, the fallout would still be felt globally, and there were other problems, as Maddix proceeded to point out.

“Mister President, we also need to prepare for rioting and general anarchy. We’ve already seen a fifteen percent nationwide uptick in violent crime. That was while Set was a conspiracy theory.” He raised a finger out the window. “Now we’re going to tell them the worst fantasies of every tinfoil hat wearing survivalist are our optimistic projections? It’ll take martial law to maintain any semblance of order in the streets.”

“How long do you think we’ll need to suspend the Constitution?” President Jenkins inquired.

A long silence greeted his question. “Mister President, NSA says permanently. Assuming the meteor actually strikes.”

“Sonofabitch,” Jenkin’s head fell into his palm.

Maddix resumed, “Mister President, the increase in crime would be bad enough. But we’re going to have a flood of would-be-refugees at every spaceport, harbor, and air terminal in the country. Our roadways will be clogged within minutes of this becoming news. We need maximum security detailed to control travel before we announce Set’s impact.”

“Let them?” Jenkins answered with a shrug. “Planetary Evacuation is the best solution.”

“Evacuate to where?” the General answered with polite firmness. “I’m not with NASA, but I know these numbers. The average orbiting station is filled to eighty percent capacity. The Armstrong Lunar Colony reports at ninety percent. The Mars colony is five years from launching.”

“And, of course, all our current space-based colonies are dependent on planet-side trade for vital resources,” the President finished.

“For survival?” Maddix interjected, “You don’t believe they can’t endure without Earth?”

The President shrugged. “Your guess is as good as mine. I have a decent grasp on economic reality. Or at least I did until I heard I was going to have to announce the end of the global market a half hour ago.” He allowed himself a rueful grin. “But who knows what they can endure for a hundred years.”

“Still, wouldn’t it be worthwhile to at least approach China and the Europeans to see if they would partner with us to expedite the Mars mission?” Maddix contested.

“With all respect,” General Torray began flatly. “Now you want us to go public that our plan is to let at most fifty thousand people out of eight billion onto a Martian Lander? Dear God! You might as well shoot every officer in the military around the world while you’re at it!”

“What about Fallout Shelters?” The President asked with a one-sided shrug.

“For a hundred years?” Maddix’s face broke into a scowl. “Hell, they won’t be able to grow anything, keep water. Look at Chicago! Did the shelters work for them?”

“We’ll dig them deeper, and load them with non-perishables and water,” Torray replied. “We’ve enough time and it will keep people busy and allow them hope. That might help stave off riots too.”

“You can’t possibly provide enough supplies, General!” Maddix cut in. “You’ll just be telling them to die slower.”
“This is about survival,” the General countered, “That requires giving hope to as many as possible, so that those who can live get the chance to do so. If we announce ninety-nine percent of the human race has no chance of survival, we’ll all die before the meteor has the chance to finish the job.”

President Jenkins waited, but the debate fell silent. He drained his glass of water, and then whispered, “Martial law, effective ten minutes ago. I’ll announce the crisis to the American people tonight. I’ll also tell them we’re advancing every contingency plan for the survival of the human race. Do we have any weapons more likely to destroy Set than nuclear missiles?”

“No, Mister President,” General Torray answered. “Our best lasers wouldn’t have the power to disturb an object this size if they had a week of continuous fire. And the heat dispersion would leave them ineffective at over a thousand miles.”

One hundred percent casualties if the meteor struck in the predicted zone. A mere ninety percent of humanity would die if it landed in the ocean instead. And according to NASA’s estimates, all the shelters would do was prolong the inevitable. That is, if the geological upheaval was not worse for them than on the surface. He sighed, “That’s enough bad news for this afternoon. It looks like I have a speech to deliver.”

He hit a button on his watch, opening a communication channel, a second button speed-dialed his speech-writer. “I’m going to need to put a happy face on a veritable shit-sandwich, Drew.”

After sending him a brief of the file on Set, his former campaign manager did not blink. “I’ll take care of the press conference after, Art.”

He returned to the Oval Office and let them powder him. Drew e-mailed the file, and President Jenkins tried to read it as they tended to his face. Why doesn’t this ever work as well for me as it does the actors in Hollywood. How would one of them make this nightmare sound?

They finished, and he ushered them out, announcing, “Computer, prepare message for tape delay, to be released at eighteen-thirty hours.”

Sitting at the Resolute Desk, his eyes glazed over the words at first, and he began reading them as they scrolled over his screen as much out of reflex and rote memory as belief. But as he went on, he knew that Drew had outdone himself. It was a damned fine speech. Maybe the best President Jenkins had ever delivered. Smiling, he locked the file and retreated to the Executive Quarters. He actually enjoyed the hour he spent with his wife and children. Perhaps the first time he had done so since the election. After giving them a hug he nodded at the Vidscreen.

“Dad’s going to speak soon, and I have some paperwork to finish. Watch my speech, it’ll put you all to sleep.” He winked at them.

He stopped in the study and reached in his desk with a glance around the room. Inside was a pre-production EPS, Energy Projectile Sidearm. The gun-control crowd was already gearing up to say the Second Amendment did not cover beam weapons. But for now, they were still ‘arms.’ Hurray for the Constitution. Even the President had the right to carry, and no one was going to deny him a permit.

Tucking the palm-sized box in his waistband, he left the study with some papers and returned to the Oval Office. He idled with an occasional stamp of a Situation Report until the computer beeped; telling him the speech had started. Then he stood and motioned at the Secret Service Officer.

“I’m gonna take a leak, Frank.”

The man looked too big for his suit. But his gaze was typical Secret Service automaton. Even in private, where many Agents would act almost human. But invading the President’s privacy in the bathroom was beyond the call of duty. Artemis Jenkins closed and locked the door behind him, and remembering the empty chair, he turned over the SitRep and wrote, ‘Don’t let that idiot Sheffer anywhere near this Office.’

That final Administrative task complete, he drew his new weapon, Should it be called a Laserarm? It had a safety beneath the over-sized trigger beneath the box. The large ‘barrel’ was necessary to dissipate the heat. Or so they said. President Jenkins had never had a chance to test it.

No time like the present, he decided. After all, do I really want to be remembered as the man who presided over the destruction of the United States? Would I want to live in the Hole? Or orbit in a tin can and watch everything I worked for get buried in a layer of ash? Hell no!

Placing the working end of the gun directly under his chin, he took a deep breath, only to hear Frank beating on the door. He lamented his loss of privacy, and then pulled the trigger. Artemis Jenkins, the last elected President of the United States of America, was found dead before the broadcast of his final speech had completed.
* * *

Orbital Corporate Headquarters
AHD Technologies Unlimited
New Aberdeen Space Colony
2 October, 2141

Jonathan Rocheforte set an empty brandy snifter on an end table before sparing a last moment to gaze upon the Earth. Three hundred miles below, his former homeland floated past beneath them. Damn you to Hell, Jenkins. If you hadn’t been such a pantywaist, the ones we’re leaving behind might have stood a chance.

Above the window, a screen displayed a magnified rendering of the region of space through which Set tumbled on its collision course. In four weeks, people in the Southern Hemisphere would be able to look into their night sky and observe the harbinger of the apocalypse with their naked eyes.

“Thank God I won’t be here to see it,” Rocheforte whispered.

The governments continued their two-fold strategy of martial law to contain the violent coupled with false promises to the masses of fallout shelters filled with a hundred years of food and water for every city of the world. Global communications were monitored and the Internet shut down for all purposes but entertainment; every comment searched for sign of discontent. “Temporary Measures,” they were told. Rocheforte had taken no chances, as soon as the sales of his Planet-bound corporate assets had been completed, he followed by selling his homes and moving into the Executive Suite of his Corporation’s Space Exploration and Research Branch.

His best, brightest, and hardest working minds in space exploration, genetics, and zero-gravity engineering had signed iron-clad non-disclosure agreements before hearing the task in a personal meeting: Ten ships, three hundred people per vessel. Each would carry enough DNA samples to populate a small city once the ship reached its destination.

“But the best landing sites are already taken on Mars,” they had protested.

“Then it’s a good thing that’s not what I’m taking about,” he answered with a smirk calculated to infuriate.

“Io? Titan?” they guessed.

Rocheforte had waited with that mischievous expression, and then made a pushing gesture at the window while waiting for their heads to explode. They did not disappoint him.

“No one’s ever sent a manned ship outside the Solar System! We don’t know of any exoplanets capable of colonization within the reach of our present technology! How can we create water for fifty years or more? People are going to die and be born in space. What impact will that have on them?”

Rocheforte settled into his chair and waited for them to exhaust their questions without changing expression. When they had, he set his hands on his desk and leaned forward. “Necessity is the Mother of Invention. I didn’t invite all of you here to offer you ringside seats to the Earth’s destruction.”

He tapped on a button on the side of his desk, and the top changed into a monitor. With a brush over the left corner, he pulled up a set of schematics. “Here’s the plan. We have all the funds and resources we need to build the ships. We also have four-fifths of the technology required. Drives, life support, waste reclamation. All are settled. Art-Grav can be produced with rotating sections. It’s not a matter of inventing the wheel, only making ten of them. Bigger than anything we’ve ever done before.”

He slid the schematic over to the side, and then filled the empty half of the screen with a star map. “This is the real challenge. Where are we going? Ten colony worlds, in as many systems. We’ll never have the resources and motivation to attempt this again. So if humanity is ever going to leave this Solar System, it has to be now. If we can’t be motivated to do it with our survival at stake, then we’ve condemned humanity to wait for a disaster to strike our orbital colonies. Or war to destroy them. Or for the Sun to die.” Rocheforte jutted his chin. “Even if Set doesn’t kill the planet, the human race will go extinct if we don’t achieve this. You have all the resources of the Corporation at your disposal. Get crackin’.”

If bankruptcy would have been an issue, Jonathan Rocheforte would have killed the project a dozen times over. When the last of the Persephone and her sister ships left orbit, the company would hardly have enough money to leave the lights on in their New Aberdeen offices. A skeleton crew, mostly accounting and public relations, would remain behind in case word could ever be sent back whatever remained of humanity in the Sol System of their venture.

Rocheforte wondered if this was what the colonists of the Mayflower or any of those early sailing ships felt when they had braved the edge of the world and dragons beneath the waves. He turned away from Earth and crossed his arms to behold the docked Persephone. A half-mile long vessel, it’s bow a globe containing the control room and navigation systems. A long, narrow rectangular living area orbited by two rotating sections, one just aft of the bridge, and the other just forward of engineering. Estimates suggested it would take sixty years to cover the forty light years to their target system. Even with good health in his late fifties, he doubted he would live to see their arrival. Estimates suggested no more than a tithe of the three hundred boarding the vessel would leave it again. An entire generation would pass inside a flying tin can. Children unborn would be adults entering middle-age as they reached a new world and touched ground for the first time. He guessed five hundred colonists would either disembark on a new world, or die in the void of space.

No. We will not fail! The Chairman buried his doubts deep. He would provide the face of confidence for every person on the Persephone. They would continue to have faith, because he would assure them, like Moses to the Israelites. When systems that had not yet been tested needed repairs, he would assure the workers of their success. Perhaps he would never see their new home with living eyes. But he would ensure everyone knew he was certain of their success.

Acamar. I like the ring of it. Jonathan Rocheforte watched one last display of the model depicting impact. The black cloud of soot and ash blocking the sun’s rays. Storms and earthquakes disrupting millions of years of tectonics. The slow descent of particulate matter to a brown, barren world. Then the Ice Age. His best minds doubted that Earth could ever support human life again. For all he knew, the last remnant of humanity would survive because of this voyage. So he turned his back on the Cradle of Humanity and stepped into the lift to take him to the Persephone. Set might kill every human being on Earth. Life would prevail.
* * *

Outside Highgate
Acamar V
24 April, 2200
58 Years Post-Set

The strange creatures somehow made walking on two legs look less ungainly than the hunter could imagine it being. Thoria distrusted these newcomers immediately. They had predator eyes, and yet worked like a hive of teal stingers. Their strange tongue lacked the clicks and whirrs that characterized Bhakatzi. Yet their machines indicated intelligence matching, if not exceeding, their own.

Their Mellei had warned of the Star-travelers coming to their world. Some wondered if they were messengers from the Gods. Others said they should be killed before they infested Kr’Baja. Now that the Twin Brothers had risen, Thoria spared enough time to look into the sky, where he saw the not-star glimmering in the sky. He wished the Night Hunters would smite these invaders. But the Gods seemed intent to allow their Faithful to fight for their world.

The Mellei could debate whether or not these ‘humans’, as they told Thoria the others named themselves, came as conquerors or saviors. But he already had his answers. Those large metal barrels looked like weapons, and the strange lightning that coursed through the fences had hurt several hunters already. War was inevitable. The Bhakatz knew Kr’Baja was deadly as it was beautiful. Danger lurked in the water and beneath rocks. Why should the stars above be different? If the Gods decided to test his people, Thoria would prove himself ready. To live was struggle. Only the dead knew peace. This was a lesson his people would teach these humans.

Am I The Only One Who Thinks

that there are a spate of authors whose works are TRYING to suck the fun OUT of Steampunk?

Books where everything Steam or Airship related is EVIL. Where the main characters are too busy with their angst to have an adventure. Where the wonder of invention and the Future That Never Was is turned into a joyless recreation of their assumption of the Industrial Revolution.

I met Steampunk through the Difference Engine, The Anubis Gates, The Peshawar Lancers, and The Parasol Protectorate. They made me want to write steampunk adventures as well. Sure, there’s a lot wrong with the world, Otherwise what wrongs would our heroes right? But they didn’t get burdened with soul-sucking angst or hate every contraption invented.

It’s almost as if a certain segment of the writing community is afraid that someone, somewhere, is reading purely for fun and Escapist entertainment, and they have to be converted to reading ideological treatises masquerading as fiction. The problem is, Steampunk exists on the Rule of Cool. There is nothing cool, or fun, or interesting, about political narrative overriding fictional narrative. It isn’t enough they are destroying classic Sci-Fi, now they must branch out and neuter every other subset of Speculative Fiction as well.

If you’re asking what books I’m aiming at, well why would I be so mean as to link to them?

Congratulations to Jurgen Klinsman

On being shortlisted to the FIFA World Manager of the Year Award. The nomination does surprise me slightly. But in the spirit of supporting our National Team Manager more than the Commissioner of MLS would like me to, let me put forward this argument:

1) Although Bob Bradley did lead the team out of the group in 2010 South Africa, it was a markedly easy–indeed, as easy as the US could ever hope to gain–group. Yet despite this, we were 30 seconds and a dramatic Donovan goal from MISSING the knockout round (or a routine save by an awful England Goalkeeper in the 1st match). And then we lost to a Ghana side most thought we should have beaten. All in all, yes we got through, but it was nothing to be satisfied about.

2) The US in Brazil had it’s Plan A shredded in 20 minutes, along with Jozy Altidore’s hamstring. The #2 striker, Aron Johannson, was injured before halftime of the same Ghana rematch. So for the rest of the World Cup, we had a non-striker playing target forward in Clint Dempsey. We were essentially left bereft of international goalscoring talent by those injuries, outside of Dempsey, who playing up top, opposing defenses could then key on.

3) Also because of those injuries, Michael Bradley was forced to play without an option ahead of him. In the beginning of the Ghana match, the team was fluid, aggressive, with crisp passing that left their opponent little choice but to commit dangerous foul after dangerous foul. It truly ought to have been 2-0 or 3-1 before half. The injuries changed the way the entire team played. And yet, they advanced out of a group that most observers said the US would fail to qualify from, and very well might finish last with 0 points.

4) In fact, despite the injuries, we were exactly 30 seconds from rendering the Germany match a meaningless friendly. If not for Geoff Cameron playing a 3 instead of a 6 match, we beat Portugal, and are through with 6 points and have nothing but placement to play Germany for. We’d have been as well-rested as Belgium, IF we had been forced to play them at all.

That the US accomplished that with what was, in truth, a makeshift, plan C lineup, speaks well of the coach and the mentality he instilled in them. Whatever Landonphiles want to say about his exclusion, the team played well. Well enough for Klinsmann to merit the shortlist, IMHO.

#GamerGate: The Players and the Played

tariencole:

I’ve been wanting to write on #GamerGate for a long time. But this pretty much sums up the Sarkeesian angle. Then there is the fact that trading favors for positive reviews—in any manner, whether for coin, jobs, or in the horizontal position–is not just wrong, it’s so unethical as to render the person unfit for any work above Food Service the rest of their lives.

And to be clear, the payment of favors for positive reviews is NOT a new thing in gaming. Stepping into the wayback machine, there is the infamous example of Ascendancy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascendancy_(video_game) Where the game reviewer wrote the barking STRATEGY GUIDE. Uh…yeah.

The lack of ethics in game reviews is not a new problem. Blaming the gamers for the lack of ethics in reviews, OTOH is a new, salacious low.

Originally posted on Paula Wright:

The #GamerGate controversy reached a new high (or low depending on your perspective) recently when one of its main protagonists, the radical feminist and cultural critic, Anita Sarkeesian, was featured on the front page of the New York Times. Ironically, in view of the focus of her criticism about passive female characterization in video games, she herself was cast as the “damsel in distress”, under threat from active male protagonists.

Ostensibly, headlines like this are a direct validation of her work. Sarkeesian asserts that video games directly contribute to a culture of gendered violence in real life and – hey presto – there it is!  

But are radical feminist claims about games promoting violent norms really correct?  Studies of violence in video games say no. Last year the U.S. Supreme Court evaluated the evidence and came to a disappointing conclusion for people, like Sarkeesian, who are fond…

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OK. Who Thought of THIS Theory?

Really. It wasn’t someone who followed the comics, or any other zombie series. It must be someone whose idea of quality Sci-fi on TV was the last seasons of Lost. After it had lost all narrative cohesion and ran amok in its own mythology.

So apparently *fans* have suggested all of The Walking Dead takes place in Rick’s coma-suffering head. Fortunately, this was shot down by Kirkman here: https://tv.yahoo.com/news/walking-dead-creator-lays-rest-coma-fan-theory-000100877.html. To be fair to Lost, even IT did not go to that lame depth. That’s something only Dallas could do and keep its fans.

So now those who decided TWD was going into night-time soap opera territory can lay this to rest. It really *is* a Zombie Apocalypse.

Book Review: Islands of Rage And Hope

The third book of John Ringo’s Black Tide Rising Series marks the time the series should drop the “Rising.” The Zombie infection is now officially being pushed back, and the push to make large scale vaccine for the sub crews and others is on.

Though the blurb focuses on Guantanamo Bay, the clearance of the Cuban military base is only one–and indeed a lesser–highlight of the book. The characters gained from that clearance recur throughout, and there is friction between them and the “Iwo” Marines of book 2, let alone the Wolf Squadron proper. For those who have not followed this series (and you should), it’s worth noting here that Ringo’s zombie apocalypse is considerably less anti-military than either Romero or The Walking Dead is. That’s not to say he doesn’t critique elements of the military, as in most of his works, he does with vigor. But unlike those others, Ringo’s take on the people who serve recognizes that most are more flexible and capable than the Hollywood and New York elite give them credit for. So why did the Apocalypse happen? Because someone created the perfect storm disease.

New characters like Walker get considerable time in this book, and his arc is a fascinating journey which makes what could have been an overly convenient climax in other hands believable in Ringo’s.

If I had any reservations about this volume of the series, it’s that the pacing at times felt a little off. That perhaps we spent too much time pointing out Faith’s shortcomings (Why doesn’t her sister’s get lampooned nearly as often, for example?). And that at this point, even those appear ‘cute’ rather than ‘dangerous.’ That said, the finale is a flat-out brilliant action scene, matching some of Ringo’s finest. And it both gives a glorious end to this book and points to a potential powder keg in the future.

I believe I rounded up on an earlier volume of the series, so this is probably a slight round down. It’s not perfect. But a solid, and enjoyable, entry in a unique take on zombie lore.

Superversive Human Waves out of Darkness

tariencole:

I have to admit, this is a rather clever way to have terrible things happen, and yet not go all morbid GrimDark. Though to be fair, Joe Abercrombie can go there and it STILL be brutal. So did Glen Cook.

Originally posted on madgeniusclub:

By now everyone here has to know that my imagination tends to the dark. Although that may be a tad understated, since even in the fluffiest, silliest thing I’ve ever written (Knights in Tarnished Armor, for those who are wondering) there’s a really broad streak of darkness under all the fluff.

So how does someone that dark get to be all Human-Wavey and superversive?

To start with I refuse to write horror. If I tried I’d either drive myself insane or go so grimdark it would make Lumley look like a wimp. Yes, that Lumley. Yes, that vampire series. This is why I Do Not Do Horror. My imagination goes there all by itself. I don’t bloody well need to wallow in it.

Instead, I deliberately aim for the lighter side of things. I focus on the characters and how they deal with whatever crapsack world my imagination decided to…

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Yes I’m Doing NaNoWriMo This Year

As I have every year for the past few. My project is a Space Opera, a sequel to my 2012 project in fact. It’s called The Procoyon Revelation. http://nanowrimo.org/participants/rangersg/novels/the-procoyon-revelation

It’s a galaxy at war, with shifting alliances, big battles, lots of intrigue, and plenty of snark, guns, and action. A touch of romance too, of course. ;) This is one of those things I am without question writing for me. I may have settled in fantasy, but classic Sci-Fi is how I discovered Speculative Fiction. And Space Operas are still some of my favorite viewing. For my money, seasons 2-4 of Babylon 5 are still the best television that’s ever been aired. Firefly not far behind. This is a cross of the more epic scale of B5 with the sensibilities of the latter.

I’ll let the reader guess what that means. ;)